Double Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

The bonding of the double pier in Flemish bond (see Fig 201) clearly requires a lot of brick cutting, but it is possible to simplify the bonding arrangement and reduce the amount of cutting involved. The alternative arrangement (see Fig 202) completely goes against the principles of bonding previously described; this example would require the pier bond to be set-out first. Simplifying the bond does increase the number of vertical straight joints within the pier, which reduces its strength, but not to the point where the purpose of the pier is significantly compromised or undermined. Strictly speaking, in terms of the principles of bonding, this alternative approach is incorrect, but the bond does ‘work’ and the pier still does its job. As a result, it does tend to be more common practice on site.

Double Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 201 Flemish bond, two-brick wide double attached pier.

Double Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 202 Flemish bond, two-brick wide double attached pier (alternative, simpler bonding arrangement).

Double Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 203 Flemish bond two-brick wide double end pier.

 

Running-in Walls with Attached Piers

A boundary wall that is long enough to incorporate attached piers in the middle will be run-in to a string-line. When this is done, the attached pier is always kept one course behind the main wall – that is to say, each course of the wall is run-in to the line, then the line is removed so that the corresponding course of the attached pier can be completed. Constructing the wall in any other order would mean that the pier brickwork would interfere with the positioning of the string-line, preventing the main wall being run-in in one go.