GARDEN WALL BONDS

Bricks tend to vary in size and the most significant variation is usually in their length rather than any other dimension. In the case of one-brick walls in English or Flemish bond, the variation in length of the bricks used as headers means that, while an even and vertical face plane can be achieved on one side, it is impossible to achieve the same on the back. For this same reason, it is impossible to plumb up both sides of a one-brick wall.

To get over this, at least in part, particularly where both sides of a one-brick wall will be seen (such as on a free-standing garden wall), English and Flemish bonds are

varied by reducing the number of headers. This forms a ‘Garden Wall’ variation of the bond.

For English garden wall bond, the number of stretcher courses is increased to three or five between header courses, to improve the appearance of the rear face plane when both sides are seen. Strength is compromised due to the vertical collar joint that is formed between the front and back of the stretcher courses and runs the whole length of the wall.

GARDEN WALL BONDS

Fig. 97 English garden wall bond.

For Flemish garden wall bond, the number of stretchers is increased to three or five between headers in each course, again to improve the appearance of the rear face plane. Compared to English garden wall bond, Flemish garden wall bond is stronger as the headers are more evenly distributed. This bond provides for a better compromise between strength and appearance.

GARDEN WALL BONDS

Fig. 98 Flemish garden wall bond.