Oversailing Courses

A simple brick-on-edge coping, regardless of how weather-resistant the bricks are, still has one fundamental disadvantage. The front and back of the brick-on-edge coping are flush with the front and back of the wall, with no overhang or projection. This lack of a ‘weathering’ means that rainwater can simply run down the front and back of the coping on to the face of the brickwork below, leaving it susceptible to frost damage in winter. Unless the main wall has been built from hard-burnt engineering bricks as well, such a finish is best avoided.

One easy way of providing a weathering that will protect the brickwork below the brick-on-edge coping is to introduce an oversailing course (see Fig 218).

Oversailing Courses

Fig. 217 Frost-damaged brickwork below a simple brick-on-edge coping.

Oversailing Courses

Fig. 218 Brick-on-edge coping laid on top of an oversailing course.

The weathering is provided by the oversailing course, which projects up to 30mm from the face of the wall and is finished off with a sloping mortar fillet. The fillet, combined with the projecting brickwork, provides an inclined surface to help throw water clear of the wall face. As much consideration should be given to the choice of brick for the oversailing course as for the brick-on-edge; it is not uncommon to see both constructed with engineering bricks.