Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

The principles of bonding attached piers in Flemish bond is approached in much the same way as for English bond but, for the sake of convenience and to avoid excessive cutting, the face bond of

the pier usually ends up as English bond. Flemish bond for the main wall, being alternating headers and stretchers in the same course, also means that piers attached to Flemish bond walls are tied in wherever stretchers occur in the main wall so the pier becomes tied in on every course and not just alternate courses.

On the example shown in Fig 196, spayed cuts (‘A’ and ‘B’) known as ‘King Closers’ have been introduced on alternate courses. Placing a full header in the main wall (at position ‘A’) and merely placing a half-brick on the right-hand side of the pier (at position ‘B’) would correctly maintain the face bond, but would result in a continuous vertical joint throughout the height of the wall and the pier not being tied in on every course.

Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 197 Flemish bond, two-brick wide single attached pier.

Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 198 Flemish bond, two-brick wide single end pier.

Further increased stability can be achieved for free-standing walls by doubling the size of the attached pier, so that it projects on both sides of the wall (see Figs 199 and 200).

Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 199 English bond, two-brick wide double attached pier.

Single Attached Piers in Flemish Bond

Fig. 200 English bond, two-brick wide double end pier.

The principles of bonding are the same as for a single attached pier, where the main wall is bonded first and then a single attached pier is tied in to it. This is then simply repeated on the other side of

the wall, to form a double pier. The double attached pier can be thought of as two single attached piers positioned on opposite sides of the wall, at the same relative point along the wall length.