Tingle Plates

There is always the chance that lines will sag in the middle, particularly where very long walls are being run-in. If not corrected, this will result in the brickwork running out of level as it is laid to the sagging line. It is good practice, always, to check the tension in the line every few courses and re-tighten the line if required. On very long walls, the use of a ‘tingle plate’ is recommended. On every new course, a single brick is first laid in the middle of the wall and a tingle plate is placed on this, in order to support the line and prevent sagging. Usually home-made rather than bought, the tingle plate is a rectangular piece of thin steel which has two notches cut into one edge so that it forms three ‘fingers’. The string-line is threaded over the middle finger and under the two outer fingers – never the other way round – both to support the string-line and help to maintain its correct position in line with the top edge of the brickwork being run-in (see Figs 138 and 139). A dry brick is usually placed on top to ensure

that the tingle plate stays in position; this is omitted from the illustration, for the purposes of clarity.

When making a tingle plate, it is important to file off any sharp edges between the tingle plate fingers that could cut or damage the string-line.

Tingle Plates

Fig. 138 A tingle plate.

Tingle Plates

Fig. 139 Tingle plate in use to support a string-line.